Any watch collectors on it page 21 inside texas

First, the precision of a quartz movement is often preferable because it meets a functional need (to be reliably on time, to the second). I hack my Breitling once a week. It’s off by two seconds a week, and even that pisses me off. If I were still flying, I would hack out any error prior to leaving the step desk. As a bonus, the digital/analog movement in my Breitling is synched. Hacking is beautifully easy and the analog hands are slaved to the digital hack. Even basic quartz movements are precise enough, at the worst, to maintain a good hack for the period of a long flight (usually much longer than that).

Tissot and Hamilton have some digital-analog models that might be similar to the Breitling, but I don’t have any experience with them and they are probably over the price range.

Second, an aviation watch must be easily legible. This is another inherent conflict in the niche. A lot of aviation-inspired watches put all kinds of bells and whistles on the dial (like whiz wheels). My Breitling has a whiz wheel, but it’s form over function. I am not going to use it in the cockpit. As cool as they look, those little details or small digital displays are harder than heck to read when you’re bouncing around in a cockpit (think any of the Citizen Nighthawks or Navihawks). The good news is that my B-1 whiz wheel doesn’t distract much from the overall legibility and the digital windows are plenty big, BUT simple is functionally better.

Third, if you are flying between (or deploying between) different parts of the world, you need at least two time zones. The Breitling has two time zones and a dedicated UTC time zone for a total of three. When deployed, I kept one on the local time, the other on Texas/home time, and flew with UTC. Three time zones is a rarity unless it’s digital-analog.

Fourth, you need some sort of stop watch and/or timer function. Here’s another conflict. Most aviation watches achieve this with a chrono dial. From a form perspective, it looks great. But, back to function, those are hard to read in a bouncy cockpit. I have several, and they look great, but I wouldn’t count on them for flying. The Breitling accomplishes both of these functions in the digital windows, with the bezel as a manual option for more imprecise measurements.

Torgoen watches – the price is right on these guys and they look nice too. They are quartz, legible, and many come with a GMT hand (for at least two time zones). You miss out on a timer function unless you go with a chrono. I have a few and they are pretty reliable. Of the ones they are selling right now, I personally like the T9s and T25s. The T30s may check all the boxes.

Citizen – Although I question the function of the Nighthawks and Navihawks, they are good-looking watches if form is where you’re going. They also have some less complicated aviation-inspired watches in the Avion series. I have an AW1360-12H, a CA4210-24E, and a BM-7390-14E. I love all of them as aviation-inspired watches that I wouldn’t necessarily fly with professionally.

All of this said, good luck! I have tried to stick to the price range you mentioned. The suggestions would change as the price goes up. If he truly wants a Breitling though, keep an eye out for a B-1 or Airwolf on Watchrecon. You will see them every now and then. They will run you between $1500 and $2000. For my money, that’s about the right price for what you get. The newer watches in the Professional series are way over-priced (I got in at the right time!) and no better functionally.

First, the precision of a quartz movement is often preferable because it meets a functional need (to be reliably on time, to the second). I hack my Breitling once a week. It’s off by two seconds a week, and even that pisses me off. If I were still flying, I would hack out any error prior to leaving the step desk. As a bonus, the digital/analog movement in my Breitling is synched. Hacking is beautifully easy and the analog hands are slaved to the digital hack. Even basic quartz movements are precise enough, at the worst, to maintain a good hack for the period of a long flight (usually much longer than that). Tissot and Hamilton have some digital-analog models that might be similar to the Breitling, but I don’t have any experience with them and they are probably over the price range.

Second, an aviation watch must be easily legible. This is another inherent conflict in the niche. A lot of aviation-inspired watches put all kinds of bells and whistles on the dial (like whiz wheels). My Breitling has a whiz wheel, but it’s form over function. I am not going to use it in the cockpit. As cool as they look, those little details or small digital displays are harder than heck to read when you’re bouncing around in a cockpit (think any of the Citizen Nighthawks or Navihawks). The good news is that my B-1 whiz wheel doesn’t distract much from the overall legibility and the digital windows are plenty big, BUT simple is functionally better.

Third, if you are flying between (or deploying between) different parts of the world, you need at least two time zones. The Breitling has two time zones and a dedicated UTC time zone for a total of three. When deployed, I kept one on the local time, the other on Texas/home time, and flew with UTC. Three time zones is a rarity unless it’s digital-analog.

Fourth, you need some sort of stop watch and/or timer function. Here’s another conflict. Most aviation watches achieve this with a chrono dial. From a form perspective, it looks great. But, back to function, those are hard to read in a bouncy cockpit. I have several, and they look great, but I wouldn’t count on them for flying. The Breitling accomplishes both of these functions in the digital windows, with the bezel as a manual option for more imprecise measurements.

Torgoen watches – the price is right on these guys and they look nice too. They are quartz, legible, and many come with a GMT hand (for at least two time zones). You miss out on a timer function unless you go with a chrono. I have a few and they are pretty reliable. Of the ones they are selling right now, I personally like the T9s and T25s. The T30s may check all the boxes.

Citizen – Although I question the function of the Nighthawks and Navihawks, they are good-looking watches if form is where you’re going. They also have some less complicated aviation-inspired watches in the Avion series. I have an AW1360-12H, a CA4210-24E, and a BM-7390-14E. I love all of them as aviation-inspired watches that I wouldn’t necessarily fly with professionally.

All of this said, good luck! I have tried to stick to the price range you mentioned. The suggestions would change as the price goes up. If he truly wants a Breitling though, keep an eye out for a B-1 or Airwolf on Watchrecon. You will see them every now and then. They will run you between $1500 and $2000. For my money, that’s about the right price for what you get. The newer watches in the Professional series are way over-priced (I got in at the right time!) and no better functionally.