Mdma everything you need to know rollsafe.org

Brother David Steindl-Rast told the Los Angeles Times the MDMA experience was “like climbing all day in the fog and then suddenly, briefly seeing the mountain peak for the first time. There are no shortcuts to the awakened attitude, and it takes daily work and effort. But the drug gives you a vision, a glimpse of what you are seeking.” 2 Molly vs Ecstasy vs MDMA

MAPS states “in laboratory studies, pure MDMA has been proven sufficiently safe for human consumption when taken a limited number of times in moderate doses.” 5 MDMA seems to be about as safe as skydiving, and a regulated environment would likely make MDMA safer.

Regulation could reduce the risk of fake MDMA. 6 MDMA appears to be safer than most other illegal drugs, though all drugs can be harmful under specific circumstances. 7 MDMA is safer if you follow harm reduction guidelines.

“Nonhuman animal studies have shown MDMA (structurally similar to some classical hallucinogens, but with a substantially different pharmacological mechanism of action) to have neurotoxic effects at high doses, although MDMA has been judged to be safe for human administration in the context of several therapeutic and basic human research studies.” 8

Advocates of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy stress the differences between heavy recreational drug users and patients who are carefully screened and take the medication two or three times in a supervised setting. Statistics from emergency room visits or reports of deaths attributed to Ecstasy are troubling, but they often involve users who may be simultaneously drinking alcohol and ingesting other illicit drugs. Those behind the new wave of studies point out that more than a thousand people have received MDMA in research settings without any serious problems. “There is little reason to fear,” says Rick Doblin of MAPS, the psychedelic research sponsor, “that normal therapeutic (or recreational) doses of MDMA will result in harmful functional or behavioral consequences.” 9 Impure MDMA

These other substances that are mixed in with MDMA can have worse side effects than pure MDMA – as the image above makes clear. Most illicit drugs have a greater risk of serious harm than MDMA, and so getting impure MDMA substantially increases your risks. And given that illegal drugs have no regulation, impure MDMA is a very frequent risk. 4

MDMA researcher Matthew Baggott: “To the best of my understanding, doses around 1.5-1.7 mg/kg MDMA (roughly 100 to 125 mg MDMA) are unlikely to cause long-lasting serotonin changes. Studies by MAPS have looked for changes in mental abilities after people participated in their studies, with some participants receiving 125 mg followed by 62.5 mg, and have not found any changes.”

Greer continued to track the long-term psychological impact of the session for up to two years for some subjects. “It is reasonable to conclude,” he wrote, “that the single best use of MDMA is to facilitate more direct communication between people involved in a significant relationship. Not only is communication enhanced during the session, but afterward as well.” 9

High and/or frequent doses of MDMA have been shown to be neurotoxic in laboratory animals. 14 However, no properly controlled studies have shown cognitive impairments in human users after a period of abstention long enough to rule out temporary effects of MDMA, polydrug use, and a partying/unhealthy lifestyle. Normal therapeutic doses of SSRI’s like Prozac, taken with MDMA or on the comedown, have been shown to be neuroprotective in animals, though we don’t recommend this due to SSRIs having their own side effects and risks. 23 24 “For reducing risk of neurotoxicity, limiting dose amount and taking supplements may be most important (BM).”

Like most illegal drugs, the purity of MDMA changes all the time, so forms that might once have been more reliable cannot be guaranteed to remain so. It is quite easy for drug dealers to mix MDMA powder with any substance that looks like it, so taking MDMA powder does not necessarily mean you are not unknowingly taking other substances mixed with the drug.

MDMA does not cause Parkinsons. This myth may come from an experiment where researchersaccidentally gave methamphetamine (crystal meth) to laboratory monkeys instead of MDMA. There is a horribly toxic chemical with a four-letter acronym, MPTP, which does cause parkinsonism. It has appeared as an unwanted impurity in a heroin-like (opiate) drug called MPPP, causing the people who took the contaminated drug to ‘freeze up’ by destroying dopamine neurons in the brain, just as Parkinson’s disease does. Neither MPTP or MPPP have any relation to MDMA.