Privacy Versus Security… Are We Done Yet_ _ SpringerLink laundering money through casinos

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• 1.7k downloads

Part of the

SpringerBriefs in cybersecurity

Book series (BRIEFSCYBER) abstract

It is often assumed that privacy and security are alternative values, which cannot be pursued together. Hence, the strength of the “nothing-to-hide argument”: if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear. Besides, ensuring the security of the network itself is said to actually require a detailed analysis of network flows. Reasonable expectations of privacy should thus progressively disappear in cyberspace. While it is true that enforcement of legal rules is a real challenge when communications are transmitted through the means of a borderless network, the evolution of the case law of the european court of human right recently followed by the court of justice of the european union does show that the right to respect for private life should have important implications online and in particular should significantly restrict the systematic collection and retention of content and traffic data by both public and private actors such as internet service providers.Laundering money through casinos

at a time at which data-gathering and data-matching technologies are more sophisticated than ever, as illustrated by snowden’s revelations, it is crucial to fully comprehend the interaction between the protection of privacy and the furtherance of security in order to set appropriate limits to surveillance practices. The purpose of this chapter is therefore twofold: first, to shed light upon the european approach to privacy and explain the interplay between privacy law, data protection law and data retention law; second, to explain how the values of privacy and security should be balanced together and in particular how privacy law should serve to scrutinise the appropriateness of measures implemented to ensure the security of the social group at large.

• 1 readers

• 1.7k downloads

Part of the

SpringerBriefs in cybersecurity

Book series (BRIEFSCYBER) abstract

laundering money through casinos

It is often assumed that privacy and security are alternative values, which cannot be pursued together. Hence, the strength of the “nothing-to-hide argument”: if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear. Besides, ensuring the security of the network itself is said to actually require a detailed analysis of network flows. Reasonable expectations of privacy should thus progressively disappear in cyberspace. While it is true that enforcement of legal rules is a real challenge when communications are transmitted through the means of a borderless network, the evolution of the case law of the european court of human right recently followed by the court of justice of the european union does show that the right to respect for private life should have important implications online and in particular should significantly restrict the systematic collection and retention of content and traffic data by both public and private actors such as internet service providers.Laundering money through casinos at a time at which data-gathering and data-matching technologies are more sophisticated than ever, as illustrated by snowden’s revelations, it is crucial to fully comprehend the interaction between the protection of privacy and the furtherance of security in order to set appropriate limits to surveillance practices. The purpose of this chapter is therefore twofold: first, to shed light upon the european approach to privacy and explain the interplay between privacy law, data protection law and data retention law; second, to explain how the values of privacy and security should be balanced together and in particular how privacy law should serve to scrutinise the appropriateness of measures implemented to ensure the security of the social group at large.